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Search Results 0 to 39 of about 40 (some duplicates have been removed)
started talking about role of law. i said to him at the time, what strikes me about this topic was that other than the occasion i can think of, other than when paul worked at the state department and bill clinton was president, this topic in my view has never gotten the attention it deserves. it has been treated too much as a technical topic. not as a fundamental topic about the relations of the state's. in my experience, i always say the chinese leadership, the most distinctive characteristic is they are systematically opened. that is to say the modus operandi is on a particular topic, let's look for the best ideas throughout the world, bring them back, study them, and then customize them as appropriate for our own system. and yet in this one respect, they have been a little bit slow. we had this conversation 10 years ago. now, i will stick my neck out and say for a variety of reasons, some of which are circumstantial, some of which have to do with the leadership in the standing committee come i believe that this topic will have to become an a more important topic. and that wi
joe leiberman observed on cnn that passing new gun laws won't be easy. >> the strength of the nra that more than half of the abuts in america have guns, own guns, have them in their homes. >> brown: they already may be having affect, gun store owners around the country have reported their stock is flying off the shelves. >> we have christmas business, hunting season business now we have the political business. >> brown: back in newtown the focus remained on coping with a christmas ravaged by grief. local post office received a flood of cards with messages of hope and towns people expect to light hundreds of outdoor candles tonight for the 26 shooting victims. >> ifill: still to come on the newshour, egypt's troubled referendum; medical marijuana runs into federal law; special elections coming to the senate; helping haiti's orphans; and hundred years of "poetry" magazine. but first, with the other news of the day. here's kwame holman. >> holman: the christmas of 2012 began arriving around the world this evening. in bethlehem, manger square was adorned in decorations and lights, a
of government where nobody is above the law. where we have an obligation to hold each other accountable. >> president obama was not only honoring a public servant who inspired him personally, but paying homage to a past or a functional one. a past that is a flash in the rear-view mirror of this congress because this is the congress of today. >> as you know, the house did not take up the tax bill last night because we didn't have the votes to pass it. it's not the outcome that i wanted. that was the will of the house. >> it was the will of the house to do nothing? on thursday night, the members of the elected house of representatives decided it would you describe not their will to take a vote on their own leadership's proposal. it would have exempted the first million dollars of income from a tax increase. there was no chance of being passed into law as the president made clear he would veto it. if the speaker's plan b passed the democrat controlled senate. this was a republican proposal. house democrats would not have supported it. democrats couldn't agree to vote on it. instead, they w
.re >> ifill: plus, 2013 will be am pivotal year for the new health care reform law. ray suarez gets an update from julie rovner of npr. from the island of mindanao in the philippines, fred de sam lazaro profiles a group of peacekeepers struggling to maintain a fragile cease-fire between government and rebel forces.o >> there are many other organizations that do medical care and food provisions. never enough. what is new here is civilians protecting civilians. >> ifill: itn's john sparks reports on police officers in china, and their accusations of widespread corruption by local officials. and jeffrey brown samples the poetry about greece's financial woes and its austerity measures. >> we'll hock the person to buy our bread. if you believe the headlines, then we're sunk. greece downgraded deeper into junk. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour.n >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to liv
, in the napa valley. >> glor: and that is not all. apart from the fiscal cliff debate, some other laws are due to expire january 1, and that could cost americans plenty. for starters, the payroll tax break will end. social security taxes will go from 4.2% back to 6.2%. if the farm bill is allowed to expire, it is feared milk prices could rise sharply. hundreds of american families are heartbroken tonight after russian president vladimir putin ban all adoption of russian children by americans. it is believed to be retaliation for a new u.s. law that targets human rights abuses in russia. in the past two decadees, more than 60,000 russian children have been given new homes inside the u.s. it elaine quijano met one family whose adoption is now on hold. >> look at this. look. >> reporter: two years ago kim and robert summers decided to adopt from russia. it took nearly 18 months, but last july, the couple was matched with a 15-month-old boy. when you saw his picture for the first time, what did you think? >> i knew that this was the child i was meant to parent. and i took one look at this little g
as antidote and he promised to deliver. he practiced international trade law and washington. on behalf of the west virginia state society, i would like to introduce ira shapiro. [applause] >> thank you for the kind introduction. thank you to the society for giving me the chance to be here. thanks to mike who did so much to organize the event. he is an old friend. thank you, mike. i'm delighted to be here today with corbin. we have two books that talk about robert byrd from different perspectives. my book is basically about the senate and the last great senate as i refer to it. senator byrd was the majority leader during the period of time i wrote about. it gives you an ensemble sense of how the senate works. the book originated in 2008. i had been in the senate in the 1970s and 1980s. by 2008, i decided the senate had become utterly unrecognizable to me. polarized and paralyzed, really quite dysfunctional. i decided to write a book about the senate when it was great, specifically when i was there. [laughter] when you do something like that , you have a certain risk factor. was it reall
the conflicting answers. plus, 2013 will be a pivotal year for the new health care reform law. ray suarez gets an update from julie rovner of npr. from the island of mindanao in the philippines, fred de sam lazaro profiles a group of peacekeepers struggling to maintain a fragile cease-fire between government and rebel forces. itn's john sparks reports on police officers in china, and their accusations of widespread corruption by local officials. and jeffrey brown samples the poetry about greece's financial woes and its austerity measures. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: the election commission in egypt confirmed today the new constitution won nearly 64% of the vote in a referendum. the panel also reported turnout was just a third of the country's 52 million registered voters. president mohammed morsi and his muslim brotherhood backed the draft constitution. opponents warned it paves the way for islamic rule and curbs on civil liberties. the six persian gulf arab nations demanded an end to what they called iranian interference.
extreme mental illness with several rights laws is a deeper issue than gun control. >host: how should vice president joe biden and the white house address this. mental illness is part of the debate and will be part of the solution. >> i think they really need to look at civil rights laws and be able to intervene more aggressively with mental health professionals when people show a consistent pattern of mental illness. i think you can travel through any city in america and see massive amounts of people who are not capable of taking care of themselves. as a society, we are not humanitarian when we leave them to defend themselves. >host: this argument is not new. it is highlighted in the extensive report in "the washington post." the chair of the senate judiciary committee, joe biden, we will hear from him. the witness testifies and next to him is sarah brady whose husband was shot during the reagan assassination attempt back in 1981, jim brady. still law was named after him. let's take you back to that hearing -- [video clip] >> life is completely shattered. my daughter's life is completely
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, at least 10 states have passed laws that require people to show a government- issued photo id when they go to the polls. while supporters say the laws protect against voter fraud, others argue they're more likely to suppress voter turnout among people of color, the poor and proper id and find it harder to obtain one. in total, 16 states have passed restrictive voting laws that could shape the 2012 election, including the vital swing states of florida and pennsylvania. well, on monday, naacp president and ceo ben jealous made voting rights the center of his address to the group's annual convention in houston. >> we have a choice to make. we can allow this election to be stolen in advance, as politicians from pennsylvania and recently bragged about money thought no one was listening. talking about his state's voter id law. we can double down on democracy. and overcome the rising tide of voter suppression with a higher daughter of voter registration and mobilization and activation and protection. amy goodman: well, today we're joined by a leader of the civil rights movement who risked his lif
, but that left his senate seat open. under colorado law, senate vacancy falls to the governor to decide, so the choice fell to governor bill ritter, a democrat. ritter made a call people did not expect. he didn't promote a congressman or mayor. he didn't go for a politician at all, in fact. he went for michael bennet, the superintendent of the denver public school system. bennett was, as you can imagine, excited. he was now a senator, a member of the world's most exclusive club. that is a big job. it is an impressive, big job. a job that makes you think pretty highly of yourself. what bennett was not prepared for was that when he took that big, important, impressive job, everybody would all of a sudden hate him. and they would hate him because they hate congress, and he was now part of congress, this thing that they hate. in november of 2011, bennett went down to the floor of the senate with a chart that is still one of my favorite charts of all time. it was a simple chart. it just showed how popular different things were. the irs, the people who collect taxes and audit you, 40% approval ra
lawmakers seemed close to becoming law until jeanne boehner walked away from the deal and tried to yankee laterally pass his own bill which he called, somewhat weirdly, plan b, to raise taxes on over 100 million and suspend all leeming cuts. that plan blew up in boehner's face, however, when he couldn't get enough votes from his own caucus to pass it. here's boehner, the day after pulling the bill from the floor. >> because of the political divide in the country, because of the divide here in washington, trying to bridge these differences has been difficult. while we may have not been able to get the votes last night, to avert 99.81% of the tax increases, i don't think -- they weren't taking that out on me. they were dealing with the perception that somebody might accuse them of raising taxes. >> probably because he's asking them to vote for raising taxes. later on friday, president obama reiterated he wants to reach a broad compromise to cut the deficit so social security cuts remain on the table but in the mean time, the president proposed his own plan b, to extend the bush tax cuts on
in the house so it's got no chance whatsoever of becoming law, end quote. that's what i said back on july 25th. the only reason we ever allowed that vote on that proposal is i said at that time was that we knew it didn't pass constitutional muster. and the democrats were really serious, they would proceed to a revenue bill that originated in the house as the constitution requires and as i called on them to do again last week. to repeat, the so-called nate bill is nothing more than a glorified sense of the senate resolution. so let's put that convenient talking point aside from here on out. last night i told the president we'd be happy to look at whatever he proposes but the truth is we're coming up against a hard deadline here and, as i said, this is a conversation we should have had months ago. and republicans aren't about to write a blank check or anything senate democrats put forward just because we find ourselves at the edge of the cliff. that wouldn't be fair to the american people. that having been said, we'll see what the president has to propose. members on both sides of the aisle will
said the group would not support any new gun laws in this country. good morning this monday, december 24, 2012. we will begin this morning with your thoughts on religion and politics. as a religion influence your political decisions? also send us your tweet if you go to twitter.com -- we will begin with the sunday review section of the "the new york times" yesterday. we want to get your take on this. it does religion influence your politics? with more people saying they are unaffiliated. we want to get your take. here are some comments from facebook this morning. what are your thoughts on this december 24, 2012. it does religion influence your politics? let me show you this from "the new york times" this morning. a new poll out worldwide religion shows up that one out of six follows no religion. that is worldwide. all religions outside the united states as well. the upi story. religious identity affect voter choice. and then on the 2012 election, here is the pew forum on religion and public policy -- dorothy and baltimore, maryland. independent caller. what do you think? does religion
governor rick snyder has signed into law a measure allowing michigan areas to declare bankruptcy or fall under the control of an unelected emergency manager enabled to fire public officials and nullify union contracts. state republicans approved it this month after voters repealed a similar initiative on election day. despite reimposing a measure that was rejected by popular vote, governor snyder said -- was among a number of controversial bills recently advanced by state republicans in michigan before their majority declines with a new legislative session next month. the chicago teachers union has filed a lawsuit accusing a city of discriminating against african-american teachers and staff through its effort to reform or shut down local schools. the federal suit says more than half of the tenured teachers who lost their jobs in the most recent wave of school closings were african-american, despite african-americans comprising just 30% of tenured teachers overall and 35% in the underperforming schools that wound up -- wind up being closed. the teachers' union is seeking an injunction to
have the additional money with held from your paycheck, because the law changes, so that everyone's tax rates, this is assuming we do go over the cliff. everyone is facing a higher tax increase. not just bill gates, not just warren buffet, but anyone with an income over $25,000. and don't forget, the payroll tax goes up, too. >> so taking out for social security taxes -- no one is talking about it. that says to me, those are going back up anyway. those are about a thousand in cost -- so let me ask you, there is the actual what will happen on january first? and it doesn't sound like people will have to worry about their taxes, most people. but what about the psychological impact? haven't we already seen it in christmas buying? haven't we already seen it in hiring? wouldn't we continue to see it -- you know, won't consumer confidence take a hit? won't businesses still say i don't know, i don't know what is happening. >> already has, candy, you have seen it in this year's christmas shopping season was lackluster, at best. i talk to businesses who say we're not hiring right now. we're just
of these people trying to leave the in-laws house. >> rick: we learned the other day that gretchen loves her in-laws. >> gretchen: exactly, because there was a study and the mother-in-law takes the hit. >> rick: there must be a few people who say i can only handle three days of her. i can't go home -- >> gretchen: are you going to help them out. >> rick: you might have to spend four or five days there, get ready. find some way tie a break. there will be really big storms. >> gretchen: let's talk about this morning with an extreme weather alert. deadly storm system that slammed the midwest, snow and tornadoes heading northeast this morning. >> oh, my god, look. that's a tornado. oh, wow. oh, jesus, look at that tornado. >> gretchen: so that tornado spotted in mobile, alabama. am i saying that correctly? >> rick: yeah. mobile. >> gretchen: okay, good. one of the hardest hit cities, tens of thousands of people there waking up the day after christmas now without power. >> when it calmed down, we looked and everything seemed green, like it was popping off transformers left and right. we heard a noise. i
that the affordable care act will begin to become fully finalized to law over the next couple of years. we keep hearing those on the conservative side or republicans raise concerns about what we'll do for the country. what is your view. now you're not part profit excess. you can speak more freely. is it going to be a good thing for the country? >> yes, it will. for one reason, as an example, right now we have 50 some billion dollars a year of uncompensated care. that means people don't have insurance don't have medicaid, medicare or private insurance, don't have military coverage or anything like that, so they are not insured. they have access to health care in the emergency rooms. if they taken in and can't pay and don't go through a bankruptcy or something like that, that costs that care doesn't just go away. it's shifted over to the rest of the us who have insurance. that's $50 billion. now, you stop and think about that it could be as much as $1500 per person who pay for those who don't. when you have everybody in the system, all insured one way or another, that uncompensated care goes away
's newsroom." still to come a new battle over the president's health care law and the supreme court's latest ruling against one of america's largest companies and what they denied and what this could mean for other employers. gregg: the storm system working its way up the coastline causing messy traffic, airport delays. we've got video from one of the hardest-hit areas. >> pretty rough. we've seen a lot of accidents this far in ohio turnpike. and wish people would slow down a little bit, you know? it's pretty slick. copd makes it hard to breathe, but with advair, i'm breathing better. so now i can be in the scene. advair is clinically proven to help significantly improve lung function. unlike most copd medications, advair contains both an anti-inflammatory and a long-acting bronchodilator working together to help improve your lung function all day. advair won't replace fast-acting inhalers for sudden symptoms and should not be used more than twice a day. people with copd taking advair may have a higher chance of pneumonia. advair may increase your risk of osteoporosis and some eye problems.
are disenfranchised by new sets of law, but just a decade before two decades before your something like 1500 african-americans serving across the country at various levels is local, state and federal offices. 14 congressmen, two senators, lieutenant governors. it's really powerful. for the kenai tremendous opportunity and promise in the future and so much changes so quickly. it makes me think about her own moment and wonder how fragile is progress. >> when i was at the newberry, i was looking for michelle obama's ancestors. one other thing as kerry says whether i could find out who is the first person in the family to vote. it was a hopeless quest. but i was in the newberry library, a lovely library in chicago and i stumbled across a book that had voter registrations from the 1860s from north carolina. and i look do not book and no jumpers. and i thought it my father, he's from north carolina. otherwise, my great great great grandfather, who in 1867 40 years old, two years free registered to vote. he was approved as a voter.
into law. if you're among republicans is if you reach an agreement now and agree to tax increases, the spending cuts will get undone or never will be followed through on. that's one of the things that has held back talks, because republicans are skeptical that democrats will follow through. host: charles is on the independent line from colorado. caller: good morning, steve. i listened to it the myopic dogma in this segment over and over. the only people i can blame on this are the american people. the people who sit here and listen to these guys that are extremists and and they vote him into office -- them into office. i hear people say let's get rid of epa. if you look at how much epa takes out of our budget, that's like worrying about nothing gary people need to turn off the tv and start studying more. crack some books. look at economic spirit trickle-down economics does not work. name a country where it has worked? maybe estonia. but it's not working in greece. i heard a great saying that says when time gets tough, everyone is a keynesian. turn off the tv. not c-span of course.
to work at the state level. we saw last week the state of michigan adopted a new law that gave workers the freedom not to join a union. now, they didn't do that because it was politically expedient or that they thought it was a good idea, because it actually is probably going to get a lot of the politicians in hot water in michigan. but what they did is looked at 23 other states who had adopted the same idea and saw that they were attracting businesses and creating jobs, and these states without raising taxes had more revenue to build schools and roads and hospitals. it was just an idea that worked. it's not a political idea to give people the freedom not to join a union, it's an american idea and it's an idea that works. we can look around the country today and again, we make these things political and give them labels that are good or bad, depending on, i guess, which party you're in. but we know a number of states have been real innovative and creative with what they're doing in education. we see what they've done in florida to create more choices. in louisiana particularly. forced
, won't be over it very long, you know the way washington works. two weeks in they can pass a law retroactively and roll back the tax things but doesn't appear someh somehow new year's eve and january 1st scares these guys into doing anything. >> the grand bargain of tax reform seems a distant thought. whether it comes before or after, how do you think they will do a deal? >> reporter: it appears the white house has made a decision they won't try for a big deal anymore. whether that's a good political idea or not, we'll see. they could try to do one more big deal, try to see if politically they get the republicans to either say yes to them or refuse them one more time in trying to gain higher political ground. at this point, they seem to be convinced the republicans aren't going to work with them so try to come up with a quote minimal deal creating that line at $250,000 in income and trying to extend those tax rates and basically postpone the fight until february. peter brought up the debt ceiling, secretary geithner said we have hit it essentially. they can move money around and
, you cannot harass, you cannot intimidate. and before you make any changes in election laws dealing with registration, changing a precinct, local lines for any political position, you have to get pre-clearance from the department of justice or the federal district court in washington, d.c. so, the state of florida, for an example, never sought to get clearance to purge. and they're hiding behind there may be fraud. that's their own. amy goodman: you were on that selma to montgomery march. this. can you explain what happened, as we go back, what, almost half a century now? rep. john lewis: on march 7, 1965, a group of us attempted to march from selma to montgomery, alabama, to dramatize to the nation that people wanted to register to vote. one young african-american man had been shot and killed a few days earlier, in an adjoining county called perry county-this is in the black belt of alabama-the home county of mrs. martin luther king jr., the home county of mrs. ralph abernathy, the home county of mrs. andrew young. and because of what happened to him, we made a decision to march. i
to the health care law is of course a tea party favorite and a favorite of social conservatives, but money and the backing of the clintons didn't do the trick for mccullough last time around. key question this time, which flawed candidate wins this race or supposedly flawed candidate? mccullough is hoping to break this curse. since 1976, the party that wins the presidency loses the state's gubernatorial election the next year. it's never wavered. 20 2001, after bush was elected, mark warner, he defeated a republican. 52% of the vote. in 2005, after bush's election, tim kaine beat jerry kilgore by six points. bob mcdonnell won in obama's first year in office. it would turn out to be 40%. the electorate likely to be a little whiter, older, more conservative than it was in virginia. will it be conservative enough to elect ken kutch anele. speaking of the campaign, if you're thinking of working on hillary's presidential campaign, you're supposed to send your resumf to terry mccullough. in new jersey, where the governor's race is all about one man, chris christie and 2016. he hopes to scare off
the hat at a cracker barrel store back in october and daniel's wife, my daughter-in-law, saw me go, oh, man, i like this hat. so she made a mental note. >> sounds like you had a great christmas. merry christmas to both of you. >> thank you so much. >> let us be the first to say to you on national tv, roll tide. >> i just taught her that, guys. >> no, i knew that one. all right, guys. >> merry christmas. have a blast. >> merry christmas, y'all. >> i have notre dame fans out there, ready to kill me. but that's okay. >>> how to make this year's holiday returns quick and easy. >>> behind the scenes look at the make iing of the new jack r movie, coming up right after this. make it. we'll send them to your hotel. [ sad music playing ] this is fun. [ sad music continues ] [ knock on door ] your bags, sir. thanks. both: finally! one taste, and you'll understand. enjoy delicious dunkin' donuts coffee anytime. best vacation ever! pick some up where you buy groceries. america runs on dunkin'. aunt sally's singing again. it's a tradition, honey. [ singing christmas carols ] mmmm. [ female announce
for law enforcement. gregg: and trace is next with the remarble story of a little boy who touched lots of hearts after the connecticut school shooting. >> when i heard about sandy hook, i just felt really bad for all the kids who had died. >> i wasn't surprised that he wanted to do something, i was just surprised that he followed through with it, and it made me really proud. [ male announcer ] at scottrade, you won't just find us online, you'll also find us in person, with dedicated support teams at over 500 branches nationwide. so when you call or visit, you can ask for a name you know. because personal service starts with a real person. [ rodger ] at scottrade, seven dollar trades are just the start. our support teams are nearby, ready to help. it's no wonder so many investors are saying... [ all ] i'm with scottrade. your doctor will say get smart about your weight. i tried weight loss plans... but their shakes aren't always made for people with diabetes. that's why there's glucerna hunger smart shakes. they have carb steady, with carbs that digest slowly to help minimize blood suga
the president needs to do. there is nothing he has to sign. as a matter of law the law changes in january and taxes go up. president doesn't have to do anything. he can sit back and as taxes go up on everybody including that 1% that he has been after, nothing has been done on spending. sequestration could be rolled back with retro activity where the president thinks he is better shape on spending in january. patti ann: alan? >> you forget the president offered boehner a deal to keep taxes keep the bush tax rate on 98% of the americans. keep those tax rates where they are. not raise taxes and boehner rejected that. he had opportunity -- excuse me, i'm still talking. he has opportunity now to do exactly what the republicans say they want and boehner rejects it. >> it is beyond revenue. it is about spending. that is our problem. >> you can stop going over cliff first of the year. >> what about spending that got us in bind we're in? none of the revenue that will be generated will make a dent in our spending especially the 6 trillion the president has --. patti ann: brad, democrats are arguing
Search Results 0 to 39 of about 40 (some duplicates have been removed)